Kansas 29th Judicial District - Frequently Asked Questions

General

What number do I call for court information?


The number for the Information Center is (913) 573-2813. The Self Help Center has a staff of very knowledgeable District Court clerks who are very helpful in answering questions.




Can the clerks at the Self Help Center or in the clerk's office assist me with legal information?


None of the clerks in any office can give legal advice. The following agencies can assist you with legal questions:
Kansas Legal Services' justice advice line: 1(800) 675-5860
Kansas Bar Association's KS Lawyer referral service and advice line: 1(800) 928-3111




What are your hours?


The clerks offices are open 8:00am to 12pm and then 1pm to 5:00pm.




What is the courts holiday schedule?


Click here to view the Courts Holiday schedule.




How do I get to the Courthouse and where do I park?


For directions to the Courthouse and where to park, please click here. (This Directory is still being worked on), For now please call us at 913-573-2940 with questions.




How do I get to the Juvenile Facility?


The Juvenile building is just north of the main courthouse across the street. It is located at 738 Ann Avenue.





Records

How can I gain access to Court Records?


You can visit the Courthouse at 710 N 7th St, Kansas City, KS, 66101, Mezzanine to access the public-access terminals. You can also contact the applicable Clerks Office via phone or fax.





Family Law


Domestic

Where do I pay child support/maintenance?


All payments are processed through the Kansas Payment Center in Topeka. Contact them at PO Box 758599, Topeka, KS 66675 or (877) 572-5722 or kspaycenter.com




What is my child support balance?


The Court does not keep balances; Please contact the enforcement agency.




What is my arrearage balance?


The Court does not keep balances; Please contact the enforcement agency.




How can I get my child support lowered or increased?


Motion pack forms are available at the Courthouse in the Self-Help Center located on the 3rd Floor. Completed forms are filed with the Civil Clerk’s Office on the 3rd floor. There is a $62 filing fee for post decree motions re: child support, visitation/parenting time, and custody. You must have an address for service for the other party at time of filing




How do I get record for my previous payments?


You may request a payment history printout at the Accounting Department, located on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse.




What do I do to change my address?


Address changes must be in writing and notarized. We need case number, party’s name and current address.




How do I get a restraining order?


Please contact the Domestic Advocate’s Office at (913) 573-5153.




How do I get a copy of my Divorce papers?


Copies can be obtained either by requesting them in person, over the phone, or via fax. Requests over 10 pages will be charged $.25 per page.




How do I get a Divorce without being represented by counsel?


Forms and instructions are available at the Self-Help Center located on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse or online at kansasjudicialcouncil.org/legal-forms. The filing fee is $195 due at the time of filing.




How do I file a Motion?


Motion packets are available at the Self-Help Center located on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse. There is a filing fee of $62 for post-decree motions re: child support, visitation/parenting time, and custody. An address for the other party for service is required at time of filing.




How do I get custody of my children?


If you have a divorce or paternity case, you can file a Motion in said case. If you do not have a case, you must first open a case.




How much does it cost to file a case?


All new Domestic cases are $195, due at the time of filing.





Probate


Traffic


Court Trustee - IVD

Which child support cases are Court Trustee Cases (Non-IV-D) and which cases are Department of Children and Families Cases (DCF) (IV-D)?


The government program currently administered by the Department of Children and Families (DCF) was established in 1975 as part of Part D of Title IV of the Social Security Act. This program is usually called the “Title IV-D program” and it is a Federal/State partnership whose mission is to enforce child support obligations against non-custodial parents. State IV-D programs are required to provide child support establishment and enforcement services to families receiving public financial assistance and to other families who apply for services. The State program must attempt to locate non-custodial parents, establish paternity, establish, and enforce support orders, and collect child support payments.

Pursuant to the Wyandotte County District Court Administrative Order issued on February 1, 1991, any subsequent cases involving child support establishment, modification, monitoring, or enforcement, that are not required to be referred to DCF under the Federal IV-D program, are to be referred to the District Court Trustee’s Office. In other words, all Non-IV-D cases with children involved are to be referred to the Wyandotte County District Court Trustee’s Office for establishment, modification, monitoring, and enforcement of child support final and temporary orders, unless a "good cause exception" is granted by the Chief Judge.

Cases originally IV-D cases handled by DCF may become Non-IV-D cases when parties no longer receive state assistance. If no state assistance is being received and no money for past state assistance is owed to the State, a party may request that child support establishment, modification, monitoring, and enforcement in their case be transferred to the Court Trustee’s Office. Examples of state services include financial assistance like, partial or full childcare payments, partial or full medical insurance payments, food stamps, etc. The party that used to receive state services may request, in writing, that support establishment, modification, monitoring and enforcement of child support be transferred to the District Court Trustee’s Office. A model form to Request to Terminate DCF Child Support Enforcement is provided on the self-help page of this website.




What is the Kansas Payment Center?


The Kansas Payment Center disburses payments within 48 hours. A District Court Trustee fee, currently set at 5% of the support collected, is retained to defray the expenses of operating the office. When child support is originally calculated in a case, 5% of the base child support payable by the paying parent is determined and then ½ of that amount is added to the base child support to come up with the total to be paid each month. When the Kansas Payment Center disperses payments to the child support recipient parent, it deducts the 5% Court Trustee’s fee, before sending the payment to the recipient parent, and sends the fee to the Court Trustee’s Office. This procedure effectively charges ½ of the fee to both parents – paying parent’s half of the fee was added to the monthly payment in the original calculation and deducted on disbursement and the recipient parent’s half is deducted from disbursement they will receive.




What are the Kansas Child Support Guidelines?


They are rules judges and hearing officers follow to decide how much child support each parent is to pay toward raising their children. They guide parents to create a fair and balanced distribution of resources essential to raising children: time and money.




Who is responsible for establishing child support guidelines?


The Kansas Supreme Court is designated by law to establish and review the Kansas Child Support Guidelines. The Kansas Supreme Court appoints an advisory committee of individuals with experience in child support. Committee members have included judges, attorneys, law professors, accountants, legislators, and parents. The Supreme Court also uses an independent economist to provide the advisory committee an analysis of economic changes in the state and nation regarding costs and expenditures associated with raising children.




Are meetings and records of the advisory committee open to the public?


Yes. Advisory committee meeting dates are published on this website. Minutes, agendas, and reports of the committee are open records and available to the public.




How often does the committee meet?


Federal law requires that every state's child support guidelines be reviewed every four years, and it takes about two years to conduct the review. The best way to communicate with the committee is by email to kansascsg@kscourts.org or U.S. mail to:

Office of Judicial Administration
Child Support Guidelines Advisory Committee
301 SW 10th Ave.
Topeka, KS 66612




When is the next meeting of the advisory committee?


Federal law requires that child support guidelines be reviewed every four years. The next review must be complete by January 1, 2024, so the Kansas Child Support Guidelines Advisory Committee will resume meeting in 2022.




Why are the guidelines so complicated?


They were much simpler when they were established in 1987. Since then, the advisory committee and the Supreme Court has listened to parents, judges, and attorneys, and added rules that allow judges to consider many special circumstances before ordering child support obligations. Every rule is intended to make the guidelines fair to all parties, easy to understand, and applicable to the many special circumstances that exist for parents and children. The guidelines' complexity is a direct response to feedback from parents who are most affected by the guidelines and by the attorneys and judges who apply the rules in court.




What is the economic basis for the guidelines?


The math behind the guidelines is complex and requires understanding power functions, linear equations, and logarithms. An economist's report that explains the math is included in the committee's report to the Supreme Court. For the rest of us, there are a few basic principles and facts that are important to know.

The guidelines are based on how parents spend money on children. To help determine what Kansas parents spend, we look at Expenditures on Children by Families, a periodic report by USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. The report is based on consumer expenditure surveys from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Regional data cover Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.




How is child support determined for each parent?


Child support obligations are the final determination of how much each parent owes toward total child support. Many variables go into this figure, starting with gross income of both parents. Reasonable business expenses, child support obligations for other children, and court ordered maintenance in other cases are subtracted, and income from court ordered maintenance is added. The result is referred to as the parent's child support income. Using this combined child support income, refer to the schedules and round up to the nearest dollar amount. Find the appropriate table for the number of children in the family and their ages; add the total, if there is more than one child, and the result is a gross child support obligation. From there, parents add or subtract for items such as health and dental insurance premiums, work-related childcare costs, and other adjustments.

Parents pay a proportional share of the obligation based on their child support income. If one parent earns 60% of the parents' combined gross income and the other parent earns 40%, then their child support obligation will be shared 60-40.

Income earned by a new spouse or other relationship is not considered income. Income from public assistance and child support received for other children in the residence is not considered part of the gross income.




Do the guidelines consider that parents have two households to take care of the children?


Yes. The Supreme Court and the advisory committee recognize the difficult financial challenges most parents face following a separation. Often, money is tight before a divorce, and establishing a second home adds to that strain.

In 2004, the advisory committee adopted a recommendation from the economist to account for the establishment and maintenance of two homes. This reduction is called the dissolution factor and continues to be present in the child support schedules. Currently, the dissolution factor reduces the child support schedules at all income levels starting at $228.24 at the poverty level up to $324.68 at the highest income levels. This reduction is shared proportionately by both parents to recognize the expense of establishing and maintaining two households.




Why does the child support worksheet start with gross income for both parents, instead of, net income or after-tax income?


First, the USDA's report, Expenditures on Children by Families, takes taxes into account as an expenditure. Second, there are many ways an individual can artificially reduce income so that a net income, or take-home pay, becomes a less reliable statement of income than gross income.




But what if I have a unique tax situation?


Everyone has circumstances that are different. The guidelines give parents a variety of options to account for unique or unusual tax circumstances. In addition to an income tax adjustment, judges and attorneys have rulings by Kansas appellate courts that provide direction to account for certain personal and business taxes.




What makes the guidelines fair for families in different circumstances?


Over the years, the Supreme Court has created several ways to consider special circumstances of parents or a child. First, Kansas uses an expenditure-based formula derived from a detailed analysis of how families at different income levels spend money on their children. The Kansas Child Support Schedules start with the gross monthly income for both parents. Each parent may subtract for items such as reasonable business expenses, court-ordered child support, or maintenance. Court-ordered maintenance is added to the parent's income.

In addition to these adjustments, the Supreme Court has authorized adjustments if the child spends more than 35% of his or her time with the nonresidential parent, if either parent incurs expenses due to long-distance parenting time, if the parents do not share income tax deductions, if the child has special needs, if parents agree to support a child past the age of majority, and a general category that allows the court to consider the parents' overall financial condition. This last category, overall financial condition, is meant to apply to circumstances that don't fit any of the other categories.




If my child support has already been determined, will changes to the guidelines change my child support obligation?


Not automatically. Every child support obligation can be reviewed at least once every three years. If you believe your child support obligation would increase or decrease by more than 10% on any new order by the Supreme Court or on an unrelated change of your circumstance, you may be eligible to return to court on a change of circumstances, even if three years has not elapsed.





Jury Duty

Is there an information sheet for Jurors?


Yes there is, click here to view a PDF which you can save or print for your reference.




What is the dress attire?


Please use good judgment and report for jury duty properly dressed. Buisness or buisness causal dress is most appropriate. You can view the appropriate dress attire on our Court Etiquette Page.




Do I get paid for my jury service?


Yes, you receive $10 per day and .56 cents per mile. Mileage is calculated by an average of each zip code per day. Juror will receive one check in approximately 3 weeks.




Why am I getting called again for jury service?


If you served on a jury panel you are not eligible to serve again for 12 months. If called to report for jury duty and not selected, you can serve again after 6 months.




How did you get my name for jury duty?


Your name was chosen from a random drivers licence list.




When I report for the first time, where do I park?


You can park directly behind Memorial Hall, at 600 N. 7th Street OR you may also park on the top level in the multi-level city parking Lot C at 7th & Armstrong (1 block south of Minnesota Ave.). Before you return to your vehicle, be sure the Jury Clerk has validated your parking ticket; your parking will be provided at no cost to you, compliments of the Unified Government.




Do I have to pay for parking?


The Unified Government provides juror parking at no cost in certain areas, click here for map. Parking at a meter is not recommended. A ticket for expired meter is the juror's responsibility. Jurors with a handicapped plate or placard may park at any meter without paying.




Are there places for me to smoke?


Yes, there are designated areas posted outside the buildings.




Can I serve with a hearing impairment?


Resonable accommodations will be provided in accordance with the American with Disabilities Act by contracting the Jury Clerk at 913-573-2908 upon receipt of your summons.




If I can't make the date on my summons what do I need to do?


A deferred form may be submitted. You may also call the Jury Clerk at 913-573-2908.




I have a handicap plate or placard, where can I park?


Handicap parking is available at any metered parking spot.




Do I need to bring a lunch?


You may bring a lunch; however, we do have a variety of restaurants around the courthouse.





Adult Probation

Do I have to pay for UA’s?


We do not charge for UA’s unless the specimen has to be sent to the lab for further confirmation.




How do I find my case number


Court documents, ask your officer




I forgot who my probation officer is; how can I find out


Call us at 913-573-2846




How do I get my case transferred to a different state or county?


Speak to your officer about that process.





Juvenile Probation

Why has a charge been filed against my child?


Police reports involving juveniles are sent to the District Attorney’s Office. After reviewing the police report, the District Attorney’s Office decides if charges should be filed. The charges are based on the information received.




Does my child need a lawyer?


Kansas law requires that an attorney represents juveniles in court. The court will appoint an attorney automatically. An affidavit of indigency will need to be completed and turned in to the court so the judge can determine if you qualify for the court appointed attorney or will need to hire your own attorney. If a court appointed attorney is approved for your child, a reasonable fee may be assessed to reimburse the court. A family can choose to hire their own attorney. When a family hires an attorney, they are responsible to that attorney for any fees incurred during the representation of the juvenile




How can I help my child succeed on court supervision?


Be present and involved to the best of your ability. Discuss your child’s interests and how their day has been going. Thank your child when you see them do something you ask. Compliment your child when they make positive choices or perform well on a school assignment or other activity. Youth are more likely to continue positive behavior when they know their family is supportive of their positive choices.

Hold your child accountable. Do not ignore when your child is breaking rules at school, breaking rules of their supervision, or disrespecting your own home rules or expectations for them. Consequences for breaking rules should not involve verbal or physical abuse but do involve removing privileges such as the cell phone, Wifi, or gaming system. Be consistent with your rules and consequences. Don’t allow your child to associate with peers or friends who do not respect your home rules or expectations for your child. Remind your child that parents/guardians make rules for their children out of love and care for their safety and future successes.




How long will charges stay on my child’s record?


Juvenile offender charges and arrests remain on your child’s offender record until they request to have them expunged. Expungement is a legal process that will remove access to those charges by anyone other than the offender and a few, select others as provided by law. The process can be complicated, so it is recommended that you contact an attorney regarding the specifics of your child’s case. Additional information can be found on the District Attorney’s website (inset link).





Juvenile CINC

How can I find out my court date and time?


Call general information phone number- (913) 573-4190




Who is the attorney assigned to my case?


Contact your Court Services Officer- call general information number (913) 573-4190, use directory for Court Services Officer’s extension.




Who is the Court Services Officer assigned to my case?


Call general information phone number- (913) 573-4190





Civil

I am the Defendant on a Civil case. Will the Court appoint a lawyer to represent me?


No, the right to appointed counsel applies only in Criminal cases. In Civil cases, each party generally must pay their own attorney’s fee.




How can I change my name?


You can file a legal name change case in the Civil Department. Forms are available at the Self-Help Center on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse or at kansasjudicialcouncil.org/legal-forms.




How can I change my child’s name?


If the child was born in the state of Kansas, you may request a VS-211 at the Civil Department located on the 3rd floor of the Courthouse. You must have original birth certificate with you, and all parties on the birth certificate must be present. If the child was not born in the state of Kansas, you can file a legal name change. Name change forms are available at the Self-Help Center on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse or at kansasjudicialcouncil.org/legal-forms.




How do I file an Expungement?


If you were convicted, contact the Criminal Department. If you were arrested only, forms are available at the Self-Help Center located on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse or at kansasjudicialcouncil.org/legal-forms.




How do I file for a Quiet Title?


Quiet Title forms and instructions are available at the Self-Help Center located on the 3rd Floor of the Courthouse.




How much does it cost to file a case?


Civil cases cost $195, due at the time of filing. All Liens cost $36. All Bonds cost $36.




How do I access the Record on Appeal/Table of Contents?


Please contact the Civil Department at (913) 573-2901.





Criminal

Where is the Criminal Department located?


We are on the second floor of the courthouse.




How can I get my case number?


You can get your case number from the Criminal Department in person or call 913-573-2905.




How do I sign in for a zoom hearing?


Contact your attorney for that information. If you do not have an attorney contact the Division hearing your case.




Who is my attorney? What is his/her contact information?


You can get your attorney information from the Criminal Department in person or call 913-573-2905.




How can I expunge my case?


The clerks in The Self Help Center located on the third floor of the courthouse can help you start the process.




How can I pay on my case?


You can pay in person with our Accounting Department located on the third floor of the courthouse. You can also pay by mail or pay online with citepayusa.com.





Self Help

How do I file for divorce?


If you have children, use the forms that say DIVORCE WITH CHILDREN. If you don’t have children, use the forms that say DIVORCE WITHOUT CHILDREN.




How do I respond to a divorce filing?


If you have children, use the forms that say RESPONSE TO DIVORCE WITH CHILDREN. If you don’t have children, use the forms that say RESPONSE TO DIVORCE WITHOUT CHILDREN.




How do I get custody of my child?


If you have a pending divorce or child support case filed in Wyandotte County, you can file a BLANK MOTION in that case. If you do not have a pending case here then you will need to speak to an attorney.




How do I file for child support?


If you are getting any type of state assistance (food stamps, insurance, etc) you will need to contact DCF. If you aren’t getting any state assistance, you can contact the Court Trustee’s Office.




How do I modify my child support?


You will need to file a motion to modify child support.




How do I stop child support?


You can fill out and file a BLANK MOTION.




How do I file for a quiet title?


You will use the QUIET TITLE forms.




How do I have someone served if I don’t have an address for them?


You will need to file an AFFIDAVIT FOR PUBLICATION and an ORDER FOR PUBLICATION.




How do I appeal my case?


You can fill out a NOTICE OF APPEAL. You must make sure to file it correctly. If you have any questions, contact an attorney or go online to www.kscourts.org.




How do I file an expungement?


Make sure to choose the correct form – Criminal, Juvenile, Arrest Record/Dismissed Case-and file in the correct office.




How do I change my name?


If you are an adult, use the ADULT NAME CHANGE form. If you are wanting to change the name of a minor, use the MINOR NAME CHANGE form.




How do I amend my child’s birth certificate?


Go to kdheks.gov for any questions you have about this. If filling out and filing a VS-211, both parents must present their IDs and the child’s birth certificate to a District Court Judge and file it in the Civil Department.




How do I amend my (adult) birth certificate?


Go to kdheks.gov




How do I file for an eviction case?


Forms are located in the Limited Actions Dept, the Self Help Center & www.wycodistrictcourt.org. You must provide a copy of the notice to vacate when you file your case.




How do I file a small claims case?


Forms are located in the Limited Actions Dept, the Self Help Center & www.wycodistrictcourt.org.




How do I get a small estate affidavit?


These forms are available in the Self Help Center and www.wycodistrictcourt.org




How do I file for guardianship of a minor?


These forms are available in the Self Help Center and www.wycodistrictcourt.org





Limited Actions

What is the phone number for the Limited Actions Department?


(913) 573-2811




Where is the Limited Actions Department located?


In the basement of the Wyandotte County Courthouse.




Where do I go for the hearing?


Hearings are being held for Limited Actions in Division 1 located on the third floor?




How can I schedule a Zoom hearing?


We do not hold Zoom hearings for Limited Actions, you must appear in person.





Small Claims

What is the phone number for Small Claims?


(913) 573-2811




Where do I go to file a Small Claims case?


To the Limited Actions Department located in the basement of the Wyandotte County Courthouse.




How can I schedule a Zoom hearing?


We do not hold Zoom hearings for Small Claims hearings. You must appear in person.




Where do I go for the hearing?


Small Claims hearings are held in Division 12 located in the basement.




What is the most I can sue for in Small Claims?


The limit in Small Claims is $4000.00.




How do I find out the Judge’s decision on my case?


Provide the court with your email.





Traffic

What is the phone number for the Traffic Department?


(913) 573-4117




Where is the Traffic Actions Department located?


In the basement of the Wyandotte County Courthouse.




Which tickets do we process?


We only handle tickets from the Kansas Highway Patrol and the Sheriff’s departments.




How do I get my license reinstated?


Call the traffic department for information.




How can I find out if I am eligible for diversion?


Call the District Attorney’s office at (913) 573-2851 option 1.




What if I want to pay my ticket online?


Contact the Traffic Department to see if you are eligible.